Is the failure to diagnose medical malpractice?

| Feb 22, 2021 | Medical Malpractice |

When a person has an illness and clear symptoms of that illness, they expect that a competent medical professional will be able to diagnose them quickly and to begin treatment. However, this is not always the case. Sometimes medical professionals do not dedicate enough time or care toward understanding all of the symptoms of a patient. They may dismiss them as a hypochondriac, or otherwise simply not thoroughly investigate their symptoms or possible underlying conditions.

If this happens, a patient’s health may continue to deteriorate, and without a diagnosis, they will not be able to get the treatment that they need. If you or a loved one has gone through this painful process, you may have a medical malpractice case on your hands. The following is an overview of how you can identify a potential medical malpractice claim.

What is the definition of medical malpractice?

Medical malpractice is defined as any action or inaction that would have been avoided, theoretically, by a competent medical professional. If this action or failure to act led to damages, it is typically known as medical malpractice.

Failure to treat

Failure to treat is an example of medical malpractice. A person’s symptoms may be dismissed as minor, temporary or psychological. However, if their symptoms are, in fact, resulting from a serious medical condition, it is likely that the disease will be progressing without treatment, causing unnecessary pain and suffering, as well as a worsened prognosis.

Erroneous treatment

Erroneous treatment is a situation in which a patient is treated for a condition that they do not have, and the treatment that they receive causes further damage to them. For example, if a person is wrongly thought to have cancer and they receive chemotherapy as a result, this will cause an adverse effect on their health.

If you believe that you or a loved one has suffered due to a failed diagnosis by a negligent doctor, it is important that you take action to make a medical malpractice claim.