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Migraines are easy for doctors to misdiagnose, and according to one study, only one in 20 patients get the correct headache or migraine diagnosis. Below are seven conditions that migraine sufferers in Iowa may be thought to have. On the other hand, patients may have one of these seven conditions and be misdiagnosed with a migraine.

First, any invisible chronic illness will be misdiagnosed as an anxiety or panic attack. The symptoms, which include nausea, vomiting and head pain, are similar to those of migraines. Migraines are also commonly mistaken for sinus headaches. In fact, most migraine sufferers start out thinking they have this. However, sinus headaches are relatively rare.

The dizziness and vertigo that accompany migraines often lead to a diagnosis of Meniere’s disease, a disorder of the inner ear. Fourth, doctors frequently misdiagnose hemiplegic migraines as stroke. Both can lead to loss of sensation on one side of the body. Migraines can cause aura, characterized by visual changes, tingling, numbness and an inability to speak clearly. This leads to a fifth common misdiagnosis: that of epilepsy.

Concussion victims can experience headaches, dizziness, ringing in the ears and noise and light sensitivity for days and even months. This explains why migraines are sometimes mistaken for post-concussion symptoms. Lastly, migraine sufferers who take medications may be regarded as suffering only their side effects.

When a misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis leads to injuries and previously unnecessary medical treatment, victims might benefit from consulting with a lawyer about their options. It could be that the doctor was negligent. If so, the lawyer may hire investigators to show how the doctor failed to live up to an objective standard of care. The lawyer might be able to assist with the filing of the medical malpractice claim and negotiate for a fair settlement covering medical expenses, lost wages and whatever else applies.